Life and Business Coach


SEPTEMBER 2003

IN THIS ISSUE.

1) WELCOME

2) COACHING TIP - DON'T COACH THE GREMLIN

3) PRACTICE BUILDING TIP - TROUBLESHOOTING YOUR PRACTICE

4) COACHING IS IMPORTANT - RESPECT YOUR WORK


1) WELCOME FALL

Hello everyone. I hope you have had a wonderful summer. Out here in the Pacific Northwest we have had one of best runs of weather in recent memory. And I am happy to say the Mitten family has been making the best of it, getting our fair share of water sports, relaxing and generally just charging our batteries.  

I hope you enjoy this first newsletter of Fall. The Coaching Tip addresses a common challenge new coaches face in dealing with their clients. And the Practice Building tip comes from a draft of a book I am writing, MARKETING BASICS FOR NEW COACHES. It addresses the most common problems I see in practice building.

If you have any ideas or requests for articles, please just drop me an email.

Enjoy.
 

2) COACHING TIP - DON'T COACH THE GREMLIN

Let's face it, we humans are complex.  There is part of us that is incredibly generous, compassionate, creative, resourceful, patient and optimistic.  

And there is another part of us - which typically comes out when we are stressed, tired, or scared - that is less sanguine.  In coaching we call this small, fear-based part of us the Gremlin.

As a coach, (or a manager coaching your staff), be on the lookout for the Gremlin.  If you are struggling with a client, or if they show up lacking energy, angry, fearful, skeptical, unfocussed or impatient, chances are their Gremlin is rearing its ugly head.  And if this is the case any coaching you do will be falling on deaf ears.  You may be pitching, but they will simply not be catching. YOU SIMPLY CANNOT COACH A GREMLIN.

If you are an experienced coach, any of these indicators are simply reminders to evoke your Gremlin coaching skills (name the Gremlin, coach around it, appeal to your client's values or call forth the "real" client).  

If you haven't yet learned how to work with a Gremlin, explore ways to help the client get back to a centered, more levelheaded, place before you attempt to proceed with their agenda.  And to build your Gremlin managing skills, be sure to read Richard Carlson's book Taming Your Gremlin .


3) TROUBLESHOOTING YOUR PRACTICE

Are you struggling in your practice?  Not getting the number of clients you want?  Here are a few points to help you troubleshoot your marketing efforts:

The bottom line of troubleshooting your marketing efforts is that if what you are doing is not getting results, try something else. There are only so many minutes in a day, and if you are not filling your allotted workday with paying clients, it is costing you big time. (Let's say you're an average coach who charges $300 per client a month.  If you would like a 25 client practice and are currently stuck at 10 clients, you are missing out on $4500 in extra revenue a month - an extra $54K a year.) 

And if that isn't a big enough incentive to take your marketing seriously, think of all the people who are struggling, not living their dream or otherwise not benefiting from being coached - because they can't find you. Most coaches are called to this profession because they like to make a difference.  You can't do that if you're not coaching.


4) COACHING IS IMPORTANT 

Shaquille O'Neal may get paid more for putting a round ball through a hoop, but the work you do changes people's lives and helps realize dreams.  Coaching is important work. 

Nobody else in your life may understand what coaching does, but you do.  And if you respect yourself, and give coaching the respect your life's work deserves, others will begin to take it more seriously too.

Happy and productive coaching,

Steve


 

Life Coach Steve Mitten B.ApSc, CPCC, MCC helps individuals and independent professionals evolve and make profoundly satisfying and successful changes.

Visit Steve at www.acoach4u.com